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Eating Eggs Do Not Increase Risk of Stroke, Says Recent Study

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A recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that eating a moderate to high intake of dietary cholesterol is not associated with a higher risk of stroke.

Most of us have heard of the benefits of the eggs, but also of their bad reputation.

We’ve been told for decades to limit our consumption of whole eggs and the common recommendation is to eat a maximum of 6 whole eggs per week. This statement is still lacking confirmation as the studies are limited.

Are eggs a Superfood?

Most of us have heard of the benefits of the eggs, but also of their bad reputation.

Eggs are through the most nutritious foods on the Earth. An egg contains all the nutrients needed to turn a single one cell into a whole chicken.

I also think you’ve heard about bad cholesterol: as you eat more cholesterol-containing foods, your body produces less.

Is cholesterol bad?

The truth is that cholesterol is a structural molecule that is essential to every cell membrane, so it plays a vital function in our bodies. Also, testosterone, estrogen, and cortisol are produced with cholesterol.

Our liver produces enough cholesterol to satisfy the body’s needs because our bodies have developed elaborate ways to make sure that it always has enough available. But, sometimes, when you eat a lot of cholesterol-rich foods, your liver starts producing less, to keep cholesterol levels from becoming excessively high.

However, you should avoid eating excessive amounts of cholesterol if your blood levels are too high. Excessive consumption of high cholesterol foods can cause a moderate increase in blood cholesterol levels.

Is it wrong to eat eggs every day?

A large-sized egg contains 186 mg of cholesterol, which is 62% of the suggested daily intake. Egg white is mostly protein and does not contain so much cholesterol. Although there are no clear studies, doctors recommend a maximum of 6 yolks per week.

Generally, the eggs raise HDL (the good) cholesterol. According to researches, for 70 percent of people, there is no increase in total or LDL (the bad) cholesterol. However, some people that usually have large LDL particles could experience a mild increase in total and LDL cholesterol levels so there’s nothing to worry about.

Some studies show that people who eat eggs don’t have a high risk of heart disease, but others prove that increases the risk for people with type 2 diabetes.

A medium-sized egg contains 186 mg of cholesterol, which is 62% of the suggested daily intake. Egg white is mostly protein and does not contain so much cholesterol. Although there are no clear studies, doctors recommend a maximum of 6 yolks per week.

The benefits of eating eggs

A great benefit to eating eggs is the content of essential brain nutrients and potent antioxidants that protect the eyes.

No studies have fed people with more than three eggs per day, this is uncharted territory, scientifically speaking.

It is important to keep in mind that the response to eating whole eggs depends on the individual. Also, not all eggs are the same.

Try to eat eggs from hens that are pasture raised. Compared to eggs from the supermarket, these eggs are higher in omega-3s and significant fat-soluble vitamins.

Overall, eating eggs is perfectly safe if you eat up to three eggs a day.

Most of us have heard of the benefits of the eggs, but also of their bad reputation.Eggs are through the most nutritious foods on the Earth. An egg contains all the nutrients needed to turn a single one cell into a whole chicken.I also think you’ve heard about bad cholesterol: as you eat more cholesterol-containing foods, your body produces less.
Is cholesterol bad?

Ioana

Ioana is a food and travel lover. Her greatest passion is developing mouthwatering recipes that are comforting, easy to make, and budget friendly! She firmly believes that cooking should be fun! About me...

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About me

Hello! My name is Ioana Borcea, and I'm here to provide you with mouthwatering recipes. This blog is all about sharing my favorite tested easy to make, delicious low-carb & keto, nutrient-dense recipes.

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